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Saturday, October 5, 2019

Book Review - Trinity By The Horns: A Tale of Gods & Bots by Prana Natarajan

Trinity By The Horns by Prana Natarajan
My Rating - 3 out of 5 stars
Publisher - Self-published
Genre - Fiction/Supernatural Thriller
Publishing year - 2019
Language - English
ASIN - B07XWSSBTF
Pages - 182



My Review - 

Trinity by the Horns by Prana Natarajan is based on a space research project. The author represents an entertaining tale of science and mythological fiction where findings of Earth are a part of a start-up. The cover page left me in amazement, and surely grabs the attention of readers. It's engaging and artistic. 

Bramhanand, Bala, and Shiv were chosen by the board members to deploy bots on the planet to study its geography, topology, and accessibility. Bramha takes care of product launch and development. Bala is in charge of all the necessities during the lifecycle, while Shiv's role to end the lifecycle and shift to the next one. With the help of Gurpreet and Shukra, the trio deploys DEVA (Drivers of Economic Value Addition) and ASURA (Autonomous Sensorineural Unsupervised Robotic Algorithm) to the planet. But their different characteristics create havoc for everybody. 

The female protagonist, Shakti was appointed as a CEO to control the action of the trio. Under her guidance, they designed innovative bots that change the progression of life and death. But the threats come from her people left Shakti at a cliff-hanger. The investment of Indra and Quber will give the desired outcomes or the planet will be ruined by intemperance?

Every character has a resemblance to a God or the devil we heard or read about in Hindu mythology. Prana Natarajan exhibits the story in a thought-provoking manner. Sometimes you feel that you know about this person or that situation, but the way the author blends it with scientific notions makes it worth reading and witty.

For example, the name Yama comes from Yashwant Manda, whose work is to terminate the Deva, Asura, and Nara when their time arrives. Chandra, Suryaveer, Rahul, and Ketan choose a task to oversee the matter of the planet for a certain period; just like the Moon, Sun, Rahu, and Ketu in Indian belief. 

Shakti's character has more potential than the trio. Other characters take the story forward, but won't leave a mark. The author needs to focus on character development. The spelling mistakes and grammatical errors break the flow of reading, but it serves its purpose of entertaining the readers. I would recommend it, and I am hoping for its second part as well. 

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